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20121027
20121104
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george w. bush, who tried briefly to governor as a kind of bipartisan moderate, but then turned markedly conservative. so in those days you have the same kind of democratic rage against that republican president that you now have in reverse. it's very difficult to see where the middle ground would be for either of these candidates, and it won't be any easier if we have a narrow result, because that will mean the new president, whoever he is, doesn't have a terrificcally strong mandate from the public. won't be able to say, look, an enormous majority of the public wants to go my way. if this election is very narrow or even worse, contested, the president is going to have a very demanding job. >> when you speak to voters in ohio, everybody says they want compromise, they want to get things done. do they? >> no. by and large when you talk to american voters, and you've done this yourself, i know, yes, everybody wants compromise and everyone wants bipartisanship. but usually the definition of bipartisanship is the other side should come in my direction. so that's a hazard for any candidate,
wants to return the rates to. and the 2000s which he did not mention when george bush followed the policies very similar to what mitt romney is proposing, they actually added more than 1 million fewer private sector jobs if george bush's first term than president obama has under his first term so i really do not think that the basic economics or the history says that just going back to deregulation and high rate-- high income rate cuts is the thing that leads to growth. >> brown: and do you think professor -- >> two decades of strong growth, we saw two decade, 80ous and 90s with extraordinary growth. economists called it the great moderation long boom and that's because the stable policies are put in place. tax reform, if you like, of 1986. a bipartisan reform president reagan worked with democrats in congress, that is the kind of thing we nude to get the strong economy back. >> back to you professor goolsbee, just this question about -- >> i agree with that i think tax reform and a grand bargain type budget deal if done in a balanced way would be a good achievement for both pa
kind of promise and the political sciences say george bush was the most polarized presidency. it's a condition of life and what obama's hoping is that republicans if he's re-elected sort of collapse a little bit in exhaustion and work with him in a short period of time. >> and regardless if it's a popular electoral split, it's going to be close. almost 50% of the country will feel disenchanted with whoever is elected. and the fault lines will be quite amazing. >> let's talk about where we were last week. it felt like there was momentum in mitt romney's direction. where are they tonight? >> there was some momentum still building off that successful denver debate. and then it sort of hit the reality of two more debates after that and the continuing campaign. and i think that this momentum was starting to slow before the hurricane hit. but certainly the hurricane had a piece of this. the fact that the president gets to look presidential. you had him up there with his bomber jacket in air force one. >> and chris christie of endorsed hip. -- hymn. >> -- endorsed him. >> we talk about
the presidencies of bill clinton and george w. bush. dan balz of "the washington post" is author of a narrative of the 2008 campaign. and michael duffy of "time magazine" is author of a book about the world's most exclusive fraternity. the name of that book is "the presidents club." michael duffy as these presidents go from being campaigners to being presidents, how are they transformed? >> you know we asked a couple of the presidents who are still alive what they remember the big surprise or the big shock being when they finally stepped from being candidate into the oval office. and they say three things. one is the speed of the decisions come much faster. and unpredictably. they can't control the agenda. the second is, they're all hard. there are no easy ones and they all are fairly outspoken about just how difficult the choices are. basically there are downsides everywhere. and the third thing is that's a little more interesting. just because you make the decision doesn't mean anything happens. when ike took over from truman, truman said "poor ike, he'll think it's just like the army. do thi
something like this, and actual disaster. what was learned from katrina is that george w. bush got a lot of phones down for doing a flyover and for not going into louisiana. for acting like he could look at it from a distance. all politicians have learned from his mistakes. uc barack obama cancelling his campaign, going to new jersey, and meeting with chris christie, a republican. most people in the u.s. he has done a good job. he was talking with the army corps as engineers. in that regard, it has helped, getting all the face time on the television when you don't see much of mitt romney. >> it has been striking, hasn't it, to see him with the governor and listening to the two of them congratulate and thank each other in this campaign we have seen such bitter politics. to see a democrat and republican coming together like this. >> that is supposed to be the best of america, when there is a kind of bipartisan effort in a time of disaster. you see it exemplified by obama and christie today. this election is in a dead heat. polls give obama a slight edge. some of the other states are close.
counties in the nation to vote for george bush in 2004 and then switch to barack obama in 2008. brown county was one of them. but then it swung back to republican scott walker for governor in 2010. the question is what next? st. norbert college political scientist wendy scattergood says that even in a deeply divided electorate, the wisconsin tradition of tough-minded independent voters is alive and well. >> they tend to be moderates. they do want to see bi- partisanship. they want to see people working together. and so when they get really frustrated or if their perception is that either on the right of the left that they're moving too far to the extreme, they throw them out of office. but having done that only two years ago it wouldn't surprise you that this state could flip again? yeah, absolutely. we have a tradition of being very, very closely matched between democrats and republicans, so those independents can make all the difference. >> you can canvass, phone, input data, whatever you want. >> reporter: how many persuadables are there? that's also being pursued by some major no
. we saw that with katrina, for instance, and george w. bush. >> woodruff: dan, what about a role for governor romney at a time like this? >> well, it's minimal at this point. i mean he really has to remain essentially invisible. he can't look like he's trying to do anything to exploit the politics of the moment. so in a sense there's more potential up side for president obama, but as susan said more potential down side for governor romney i think it is a matter of just kind of waiting and watching and then deciding at what point he can go back out. i mean one of the issues is, does this short circuit kind of the surge of energy that we've seen around the romney campaign? there's no question that there is more energy out there in the republican base and at events he's been holding. does this affect that in some way that would be detrimental to him? these are all he questions that we can't answer tonight. >> woodruff: because we just don't know when they're going to be back on the trail. there's no way to gauge that. >> that's exactly right. i mean, we obviously know they'll be bac
by president george w. bush. carmona also served as sheriffs deputy along the u.s. border with mexico. democrats hope that bipartisan background can appeal to the independents, who make up a third of the state's voters. the candidate talks about republican efforts to recruit him while he served in as surgeon general. >> the republican party did ask me to become a republican. i said why? i was an independent my whole life, because i always thought that there were good sides-- both sides had good solutions to problems. unfortunately, we got so partisan now that democracy's in the gridlock, because nobody can agree on compromising. compromise becomes a four-letter word. >> reporter: and in the grand canyon state one issue and one hispanics make up 15% of arizona's registered voters, and a recent survey showed they favor carmona over flake by a six-to-one ratio. but in arizona, like elsewhere in the country, hispanics have not turned out to vote in the same numbers as other groups. if democrats can mobilize latinos in large enough numbers, they could win the election and that turns daniel
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)

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